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Hall of Famer Musial Dies at 92

The former St. Louis Cardinal and Hall of Fame member was one of the greatest players to every play the game of baseball

The former St. Louis Cardinal and Hall of Fame member was one of the greatest players to every play the game of baseball

January 20, 2013 – Stan, the Man, Musial as he was known, died late Saturday at 92. The former St. Louis Cardinal and Hall of Fame member was one of the greatest players to every play the game of baseball. I have never heard a soul say a bad word about Stan, said Willie Mays In a prepared statement.

Musial died in the St. Louis suburb of Ladue, surrounded by his family. The team was told by one of Musial’s son-in-laws that the former star had died.

Also on Saturday, former Baltimore Orioles manager and Hall of Fame member Earl Weaver died at 82.

Stan the Man had some many batting records during his career that, they would not all fit on his plaque at the Hall of Fame. St. Louis fans loved the slugger so much there were two statues of him outside the team’s stadium. His hitting was as good as or better than fellow Hall of Famers Joe DiMaggio and Ted Williams, even though he played in a smaller market than those two sluggers and did not get the recognition they did.

Over his career, Musial was the winner of the National League Batting title seven times, the MVP award three times and played on three World Series Championship teams in St. Louis in the 1940s.

His entire career of 22 years was spent with St. Louis and he played in the All Star game in all of his 22 seasons. Prior to his death, Musial was the longest tenured Hall of Famer still living.

Musical pitched when he played in the minors early in his career until an arm injury changed his position to first base and the outfield. That injury was the best thing to happen to his career as he then went on to hit for an average of .331 in his career, with 475 home runs before he retired in 1963.

He is considered by most as the best player to ever wear a Cardinals uniform and was the first Cardinals player to have his number retired.

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