Published On: Tue, Jul 2nd, 2013

Statue of Liberty Will Re-Open July 4th

Superstorm Sandy hit New York just a day after the 126th birthday of the statue, flooding nearly the entire 12 acres the statue stands on

Superstorm Sandy hit New York just a day after the 126th birthday of the statue, flooding nearly the entire 12 acres the statue stands on

July 02, 2013 - Months after Hurricane Sandy raced ashore and swamped the little island she stands graciously on, the Statue of Liberty will finally re-open and welcome visitors from around the country and world on Independence Day.

Superstorm Sandy hit New York just a day after the 126th birthday of the statue, flooding nearly the entire 12 acres the statue stands on. Water surges reached over 8 feet in the fierce storm.

Lady Liberty however was spared, but the grounds surrounding her on the island took a heavy beating from the storm.

Docks were ripped out of the water, railings were broke and paving stones were loosened and tossed about. Buildings became flooded with sewage pumps, electrical systems and boilers all destroyed.

Hundreds of the nation’s National Park Service employees, from across the nation including Alaska and California, worked weeks cleaning the debris and mud.

Over the past couple of months, mechanical equipment was taken to higher ground and workers began putting the island back together.

The complete damage to Liberty and its neighbor Ellis Island cost nearly $59 million to repair.

Some of the docks and brick walkway repairs have not been completely finished, but as of July 4, visitors will once again start arriving on ferryboats to tour one of the country’s most recognizable landmarks.

Most of the access to the Statue and Island will be the same, said National Park officials.

The statue was a gift from France and conceived as a symbol of friendship between both countries and the love of liberty they both share. The statue was dedicated in 1886. Today it receives nearly 3.5 million visitors annually.

The statue’s crown was reopened following a long hiatus, just one day before the storm hit last year and had to close due to the storm. It had been closed for nearly a year for an upgrade of $30 million to sprinkler systems, alarms and exit routes.

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